The Perfect Pork Rib Roast

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Are you ready for a juicy pork rib roast, complete with a pink smoke ring, crunchy fat cap, and an amazing flavor profile from a homemade rub? If so, you won't be disappointed with this easy-to-follow video and set of instructions from the famous Pitmaster X in Europe.

In the video above, BBQ legend Pitmaster X shows you how to smoke a pork rib roast (also known as a rack of pork or center-cut pork loin) to perfection in a Gateway Drum smoker.

This cut of meat, if done well, is sure to delight the sensations of everyone from your guests around a holiday table to your family at a weekend dinner.

In this cook, he seasons the roast with a homemade rub, cooks it to 145˚F and after crisping the fat cap, slices it and drizzles it with sauce for a delectable main dish.

Credits: The instructions and screenshots in this post were taken from the video above. We've outlined the process in writing to help you cook a delicious pork roast on your first try.

For this cook Pitmaster X uses a Gateway Drum Smoker, Flame Boss, and Blues Hog Rub and Sauce. All of these are available in our store.

Ingredients:


Step by Step Instructions for Smoking a Pork Rib Roast

Step 1: Fire the smoker

Add lump charcoal to the Gateway Drum Smoker (or your smoker of choice). Light the charcoal and let the smoker come up to temp while you season and prepare the roast.

Pitmaster X

Pitmaster X

Step 2: Prepare Seasoning

This is a beautiful pork rib roast and even though we want the flavor of the pork to speak, we'll add some good rub to give it an extra boost. Combine fennel seeds, sage, and thyme of equal parts or to taste. Grind them together, then add some Blues Hog Bold and Beefy Seasoning and Blues Hog Sweet and Savory Seasoning.

Pitmaster X

Pitmaster X

Step 3: Prepare the Pork Rib Roast for Seasoning

Prepare the nice fat cap on the roast by slicing cuts through it in opposite directions. This will help the fat render down and crisp up as well as make the roast look more impressive. 

Pitmaster X

Step 4: Add the Seasoning

For this roast, Pitmaster X first uses a coating of fleur de sel, but regular table salt will do. Rub the salt on the fat side and down into the cuts you made through the fat cap. After adding the salt, coat the meat in a medium layer of the seasoning you prepared.

Pitmaster X

Pitmaster X

Step 5: Set Up Temperature Controller

By this time your charcoal should be well lit. Now it's time to connect your Flame Boss or other temperature controller and set it to somewhere between 280˚F and 300˚F.

The Flame Boss can be connected to your WiFi and controlled by your phone from just about anywhere. It controls the heat in your smoker and helps even out temperature fluctuations by automatically adjusting the airflow as needed. It's basically cruise control for your smoker, so if you like cooking with charcoal, but don't enjoy adjusting your smoker through a long cook, a Flame Boss is a great tool to have.

Pitmaster X

Pitmaster X

Step 6: Set Up Temp Probes

Set the roast in the BBQ smoker with the fat side up. Clip the probe for the pit temp to the grate and insert the meat probe into the center of the roast. Close the lid.

Pitmaster X

Step 7: Flip the Roast

Since there is heat coming up from directly underneath, you will want to flip the roast partway through the cook. When you flip it around with the fat side down, those juices will drip down into the fire, not only creating a lot of smoke and steam, but also a beautiful flavor profile. 

Keep an eye on the fat side. Once it's rendered down some, but still a light color, flip the roast back to fat side up, and continue to cook it to an internal temp of 145˚F.

Pitmaster X

Step 8: Sear the Crust

When the meat has reached an internal temp of 145˚F, remove the meat. Open the lid of the Gateway Drum Smoker and remove the Flame Boss. Let that fire heat up for a few minutes then put the meat on a couple of minutes longer, so it gets a good crisp sear.

Pitmaster X


"The Gateway Drum Smoker together with that Flame Boss controller did an amazing job. I almost didn't have to do anything, it basically cooked itself. Look at the result, it's mind-blowing." —Pitmaster X


Step 9: Slice the Roast and Prepare the Sauce

By this time your roast should be perfectly done with a good crisp fat cap, juicy meat, and an irresistible aroma. Slice the roast between the bones and warm up some Blues Hog Original Barbecue Sauce in a pan on the stove until it's syrupy and bubbly.

Pitmaster X

Step 10: Pour on the Sauce and Serve

Pour the warm sauce over the sliced roast after it's on the platter you'll be serving it on. This sweet sauce will add some delicious flavor and create a beautiful glaze.

Serve to your friends or family.

Don't expect any leftovers...

Pitmaster X


"I love this sauce, it's such a sweet sauce and has that pineapple flavor to it. The main thing is that it's sweet and really complements the pork." —Pitmaster X


Don't have the supplies you need?

Shop some of our products here in our online store or visit our store in person for a full line of barbecue equipment and supplies.

Gateway Drum Smoker

Blues Hog Seasonings and Sauces

Flame Boss Temperature Controller

Can't find what you need online? We have 120+ seasonings in our online store along with many grills and grilling accessories, but we have much more in our store.

Visit our specialty barbecue store at 140 W Main Street in New Holland, Pennsylvania to immerse yourself in many of the best products available for anyone wanting to make delicious food outdoors.

Our store hours are listed at the bottom of this page.

About the author: Henry Hertzler is a writer and social media manager at Meadow Creek Barbecue Supply.

Smoked Beef Chuck Roast Tacos Recipe

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Learn how to smoke pulled beef and make chuck roast tacos that are tender, juicy, and bursting with flavor for a meal you'll remember.

Firing the Gateway Drum Smoker

To cook the chuck roasts, I'm using Chef's Select 100% hardwood charcoal briquettes. I filled the basket about 1/3 of the way (I'm guessing 8–10 pounds), and it was plenty to accommodate the time and temperature for this cook. My target temperature was 275 degrees F for the first phase of the cook, then 350 degrees for the second part.

Steps for Firing the Gateway

  • Add charcoal to the basket, nestle a couple of wax fire starters into the charcoal, and light them.
  • Leave the lid off and the vents fully open for about 30 minutes to give the charcoal a boost of air as it's lighting.
  • Add several chunks of smoking wood or a fistful of smoking wood pellets to the fire (optional).
  • Replace the diffuser place and cooking grates.
  • Close the lid and adjust the vents to about 25% open and adjust them as needed to fine-tune the temperature to 275 degrees F.

The Gateway drum smoker holds a steady temperature if you keep the lid shut. If you open the lid for more than a few minutes, the temperature can spike 50 degrees or even more. When this happens it will take a while for it to drop again, so it's a lot easier to work your way up than to lower the temperature.

Lighting the fire starters

Waiting for the charcoal to light

Diffuser plate in place

Reasons to Consider a Gateway Drum Smoker:

  • Basic design doesn't require electronics or a lot of moving parts.
  • It cooks large cuts of meat on one load of fuel.
  • It holds a steady temperature if you don't open the lid for too long.
  • It holds a bunch of meat for the space it takes, especially with a rib hanger rack.

Preparing the Meat

When shopping for meat, keep in mind that the best ones have marbling throughout the roast. I found some nice chuck roasts from Sam's Club and the ones I picked out were an average of about 2 pounds each.

Simply unwrap the meat and season the entire surface with your favorite beef seasoning. I used Lane's Brisket Rub.

Packs of two chuck roasts from Sam's Club

Gateway coming up to temperature

Beautiful roast

One of my favorite beef rubs

Seasoning the meat

Need barbecue supplies? Visit us at 140 W Main Street in New Holland, PA (store hours at the bottom of this page) for rubs, sauces, thermometers, gloves, gadgets, charcoal, pellets, and everything else you need to cook outdoors. You can also browse hundreds of products in our online catalog.

Smoking the Chuck Roasts

To make pulled beef from the chuck roasts, we're going to smoke them for a while, then finish them in a covered pan with beef broth to tenderize them the rest of the way.

Once the smoker is ready, set the meat on the grate and cook them at 275 degrees until they develop a nice color and reach at least 160 degrees. I moved these to a pan after a couple of hours in the smoke, then cooked them another 4 hours.

Roasts in the smoker

Closing the smoker

Cruising along

Beautiful color

Ready to wrap

A hand-held instant read thermometer is essential for cooking outdoors. We carry a full line of high quality thermometers from Thermoworks.

Braising the Chuck Roasts

Transfer the roasts to a pan and add a quart of beef broth, chopped onion (1 small onion), and chopped garlic (3 cloves). Cover the pan with foil, set the meat back in the smoker, and adjust the vents to raise the temperature to 350 degrees.

Broth and chopped garlic

Adding the broth to the pan
Ready to cover

Back on smoker

My sweet little drum smoker

Purring along

The smoker has two vents for bottom intake and a stack in the lid

Pulling the Beef

Once the beef is probe tender, it should be ready to pull (200 degrees internal temperature or higher).

Bears Paws make it easy to pull beef roasts. If you have a set of Bear Paws, I would recommend pulling it while it's still just a little bit "tight" in some parts to avoid drying out the meat. You can test it in the pan if you don't poke a hole into the pan. 

Mix the pulled beef with the juices and transfer it to a bowl for serving.

Getting close to ready

By the time it was ready to pull, I had already pulled some of it to see if it was tender.

Beautiful, tender, and juicy pulled beef

Pulling the beef with Bear Paws

The pulled beef was very juicy and tender!

Great for pulling beef, moving hot roasts, and more.

Making the Tacos

This is where it gets really personal. There are dozens of awesome ways to build beef tacos, so feel free to use whatever you like. Our family enjoys eating them with chopped lettuce and onion, diced tomato, shredded cheese, sour cream, and guacamole.

Tender, juicy, and bursting with flavor

Time to eat!

Tacos are fun because you can design them to fit your tastes.

What do you think?

Reasons to Consider a Gateway Drum Smoker:

  • Basic design doesn't require electronics or a lot of moving parts.
  • It cooks large cuts of meat on one load of fuel.
  • It holds a steady temperature if you don't open the lid for too long.
  • It holds a bunch of meat for the space it takes, especially with a rib hanger rack.

Chuck Roast Tacos

Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 6 hrs
Course Main Course

Equipment

  • Gateway Drum Smoker
  • Bear Paws
  • Disposable Full Size Pan
  • Aluminum Foil

Ingredients
  

  • Chuck roasts 2-pound
  • Lane's Brisket Rub
  • 32 ounces beef broth
  • 1 small onion chopped
  • 1.5 teaspoons garlic chopped

Instructions
 

  • Fire the smoker at 275 degrees.
  • Season the roasts with Lane's Brisket Rub.
  • Cook the roasts for 2 hours in the smoke.
  • Move the roasts to a full size pan with the broth, onion, and garlic.
  • Cover the pan and set it in the smoker.
  • Adjust the smoker to 350 degrees and cook the meat until it's ready to pull (additional 4 hours or more).
  • Mix the meat with the juices and build the taco of your dreams.

About the author: Lavern Gingerich is a writer and the digital marketing manager for Meadow Creek Barbecue Supply.

How to Make a Double-Smoked, Spiral Sliced Ham With Malcom Reed

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Would you like a recipe for a smoked holiday ham that looks and tastes amazing, but is super simple to make?

If you want a stunning centerpiece for your Christmas feast, but don’t want to spend all day preparing it, this double-smoked, spiral sliced ham recipe from Malcom Reed is definitely worth a try!

In this video, barbecue legend Malcom Reed shows an incredibly simple method for turning an inexpensive, supermarket ham into a mouthwatering feast that will delight your Christmas guests. 

What makes this recipe so simple is that most of the work is done for you before you start. By starting with a fully cooked, spiral sliced ham, you eliminate most of the work involved with a traditional barbecue recipe. 

Spend more time with your guests and less time at the smoker!

Credits: The instructions and screenshots in this post were taken from the video above. We've outlined the process in writing to help make this recipe a success on your first try.

For this cook, Malcom uses a Gateway Drum Smoker and Blues Hog Raspberry Chipotle barbecue sauce. We have Gateway Smokers and Blues Hog sauces available for purchase online or in our store.

Used in this recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 10 lb spiral sliced ham

Glaze:

  • Blues Hog Raspberry Chipotle Barbecue Sauce
  • Apple Jelly



Step-by-Step Instructions for Double-Smoked Ham

Step 1: Purchase your ham. 

Just a plain smoked ham is great. There’s no need to spend extra money for a honey-glazed ham because you will be dressing it up with a raspberry chipotle glaze. We do recommend using a spiral sliced ham as that will allow more of the flavor from the smoke and the glaze to get to the inside. Plus, it will be easier to serve once it’s done.

HowtoBBQright.com

Step 2: Fire your smoker.

In this video Malcom uses the Gateway Smoker with Royal Oak charcoal briquettes, but you can use whatever smoker you have. You’ll want to maintain a temperature of about 275 degrees Fahrenheit.

Throw in a couple chunks of cherry wood or other mild-flavored wood to give it that extra level of smoke flavor.

HowtoBBQright.com

Step 3: Prepare the ham.

All you need to do is take the packaging off of the ham and place it on a wire rack for smoking. The glaze will be added later.

Step 4: Smoke the Ham.

Put the ham in the smoker and leave it until it reaches an internal temperature of about 140 degrees. For a ten-pound ham this should take about two to two-and-a-half hours. The exact internal temperature isn’t critical since the ham is already fully cooked—just make sure that you don’t cook it so long that it starts to dry out.

While the ham is smoking, you can move on to step five and make the raspberry chipotle glaze.

HowtoBBQright.com

Step 5: Making the glaze.

 For this glaze we’re using two ingredients: 

Start by putting the apple jelly in a sauce pan and heating it until it’s melted. Once it’s melted, put in about an equal amount of the raspberry chipotle barbecue sauce. Stir it and bring it to a slight simmer. Keep the glaze over low heat for about thirty minutes, stirring it occasionally. Keep an eye on the glaze to make sure it doesn’t burn.

HowtoBBQright.com

Step 6: Glaze the ham.

After the ham has been in the smoker for nearly two hours you can go ahead and put the glaze on. Set the wire rack with the ham into a foil pan to catch the drips. Brush the glaze all over the ham, letting it run down the sides and soak into the surface. Leave it in the smoker for about half an hour to let the glaze set.

Purchase a Basting Brush and Pan

HowtoBBQright.com

Step 7: Remove the ham from the smoker.

Remove the ham from the smoker and place it on a cutting board. With a boning knife, remove the ham from the bone. Follow the natural seams in the ham to take the meat off in sections. Since the ham was pre-sliced it should be ready to plate and serve.

HowtoBBQright.com

HowtoBBQright.com

Step 8: Place the ham in your favorite serving dish and enjoy!

HowtoBBQright.com

Are you looking for a simple and affordable backyard smoker that is built to last?


Don't have the supplies you need?

Shop some of our barbecue supplies and equipment here in our online store or visit our store in person for a full line of barbecue equipment and supplies.

Can't find what you need online? Visit our specialty barbecue store at 140 W Main Street in New Holland, Pennsylvania to immerse yourself in many of the best products available for anyone wanting to make delicious food outdoors. Our store hours are listed at the bottom of this page.

About the author: William Hertzler is a writer and social media manager at Meadow Creek Barbecue Supply.

First Cook on My Gateway Drum Smoker

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I just did my first cook on the Gateway Drum Smoker, and in this blog post I'll show you the results and share my first impressions with you.

We're smoking two pork butts, two racks of St. Louis style ribs, and a few bison meatballs wrapped in bacon. The smoker has two cooking racks and I set the pork butts on the bottom grate and the ribs and meatballs on the top grate.

For this cook, I'm firing my Gateway Drum Smoker with 100% hardwood charcoal briquettes and several chunks of apple smoking wood.

Firing the Gateway Drum Smoker

After oiling the inside of the smoker as directed in the manual for initial seasoning, I fired the smoker with a basket full of 100% hardwood charcoal briquettes. You can use either lump or briquettes, but I wanted to make sure I had enough fuel for the entire cook and since this was my first cook, I didn't know what to expect.

Here are the steps I used to light it:

  • Fill the basket with charcoal, nestle a couple of wax fire starters into the charcoal, and light them.
  • Leave the lid off and the vents fully open for about 30 minutes to give the charcoal a boost of air as it's lighting.
  • Close the lid and adjust the vents to about 25% open and adjust them as needed to dial the temperature in to 300 degrees F.
  • Replace the diffuser place and cooking grates.
  • Since I was also doing the initial seasoning, I let it run for at least an hour before adding the meat.
  • Once you are ready to add the meat, add several chunks of smoking wood to the fire. I waited to do this until I was ready to add the meat so that it wouldn't all burn up while I was doing the initial burn-in.

Based on my first cook on the Gateway Drum Smoker, this smoker is pretty easy to run and maintain a consistent temperature if you keep the lid shut. If you open the lid for more than a few minutes, the temperature can spike from 300 degrees to 350 or even higher. When this happens it will take a while for it to drop again, so it's a lot easier to work your way up than to try to lower the temperature.

I had to make several tweaks to the vents throughout this cook, but it was minimal. Part of the reason for this was that I had the lid open too much for taking photos for this blog post.

The smoker itself as well as the fire basket and diffuser plate seem sturdy and well-built.

Charcoal lit

Diffuser plate replaced

Bottom cooking grate

Top cooking grate in place with the lid hanging on the side of the smoker

Burning with the lid open

Coming up to temperature

Dialed in to 300 degrees

Do you need any supplies or tools for your outdoor cooking? Call us at 717-355-0779 or visit us at 140 W Main Street in New Holland, PA (store hours at the bottom of this page) for everything you need to cook outdoors.

Pork Butts

I purchased two pork butts from Sam's Club for this. These are always trimmed nicely so usually the only prep I do is cut away any blood vessels or loose pieces of meat. Then I season the outside liberally.

For these, I used Oakridge Carne Crosta Steakhouse Seasoning, an interesting rub with coffee as the first ingredient.

Four hours into the cook, I wrapped the pork butts and moved them to the top grate:

After a total of about 6.25 hours they had reached an internal temperature of 200 degrees. I removed them from the smoker, let them cool a bit, and pulled the meat for sandwiches.

They look a bit burnt, but they were not dried out, and the coffee rub I used is designed for high heat. I think the coffee in the rub is giving it that rich dark color.

The pork was tender and tasty!


St. Louis Pork Ribs

I am extremely pleased with the outcome of the ribs on my first Gateway Drum Smoker cook!

They were tender, juicy, slightly chewy on the surface, still hanging together without clinging to the bone, with a nice touch of smoke flavor.

I purchased two racks of spare ribs from Sam's Club for this cook. To prep them, I sliced off the skirt and the rib tips, pulled off the membrane, and seasoned them with Oakridge Competition Beef and Pork Rub.

I cooked the ribs on the top rack and didn't do anything with them the entire cook except smell them and check on them occassionally. Once they were tender, I moved them to a cutting board to slice them.

My target temperature in the smoker was 300 degrees and these took around 3.5 hours to cook.

The top side:

The bottom side was not burnt at all, but had a beautiful color:

Do you need any supplies or tools for your outdoor cooking? Call us at 717-355-0779 or visit us at 140 W Main Street in New Holland, PA (store hours at the bottom of this page) for everything you need to cook outdoors.


Bison Meatballs Wrapped in Bacon

To make these I divided the ground bison into small balls, seasoned them with Lane's Brisket seasoning, a clean and simple rub without sugar and preservatives.

After wrapping them in bacon, I sprinkled a little more seasoning on top.

If you are looking for a sugar-free rub with all natural ingredients, check out Lane's Brisket seasoning.

Meatballs and ribs on the top rack

The bison is ready when it reaches 160 degrees internal temperature (I overcooked mine by accident). The ground bison I got from Sam's Club was very lean so I should have been more careful with it. They were good right off the smoker, but not too great reheated.

Do you need any supplies or tools for your outdoor cooking? Call us at 717-355-0779 or visit us at 140 W Main Street in New Holland, PA (store hours at the bottom of this page) for everything you need to cook outdoors.


My initial thoughts on this smoker are very positive:

  • It's simple and straightforward without a lot of moving parts or electronics.
  • The design is intuitive and built to last.
  • It's cooks large cuts of meat on one load of fuel.
  • It's easy to run if you don't open the lid for too long.
  • It holds a bunch of meat for the space it takes on my patio, especially if you use the rib hanger rack.

Is your patio calling for a Gateway Drum Smoker?


About the author: Lavern Gingerich is a writer and the digital marketing manager for Meadow Creek Barbecue Supply.